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Comparison of micro 4/3 system to Canon system

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I have gone on a few business trips leving my Canon system behind, because it was to bog and heavy to carry on souch a trip. I brought along my current pocket camera - a Canon Ixus 870IS, which is quite portable, but sometimes lacking in image quality. So, I eventually decided that I had to have a micro 4/3 system. This is a comparison of the image quality attainable with the two systems that I happen to have, not the two systems as such. It is in no way a scientific comparison, just some quick shots from the two systems.

The compared Cameras and lenses are

Panasonic Lumix GH2 (in 2:3 aspect mode)
Samyang 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye MFT
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 9-18mm 1:4.0-5.6
Panasonic G X Vario PZ 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS
Panasonic G Vario HD 14-140mm F4-5.8 OIS
Canon EOS 5D
Canon EF 15 mm f/2.8 fish eye
Sigma 12-24mm F4.5-5.6 EX DG Aspherical HSM
Canon 24-105 mm f/4.0 L IS USM
Canon 70-200 mm f/4.0 L IS USM

Shots were taken of the Botanical Gardens greenhouse in Copenhagen with the camera mounted on a Gitzo tripod. Canon RAW files were converted using Canon Photo Professional 3.10.1 with sharmening set to medium (5) and Picture Style set to Landscape. Panasonic RAW files were converted using Silky Pix Studio 3.1 SE adjusting settings to yeild images most closely resembling those from the Canon setup. 200x200 pixel crops were excised from the centre or (left) edge of images.

Note that since the pixel count of the cameras are not the same, the crops do not cover the same area. Also, lenses were not always zoomed to the exact intended focal length. Images with the same field of view are compared at the same aperture diameter (equivalence), i.e. 50 mm f/4.0 for the m43 versus 100 mm f/8.0 for the full frame Canon system.

Formal analysis to be added at a later time - for now, have a look at the images and draw your own conclusions

27/3/2012

 


Software for remapping fisheye
images into a rectangular projection